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Felipe Gozon
Felipe Gozon

Felipe Enrique Lapuz Gozon (born December 8, 1939), known professionally as Felipe Gozon, is the current Chairman and CEO of GMA Network Inc., one of the largest media networks in the Philippines.

A lawyer by profession, the Yale-educated Gozon is seen as the network executive who has successfully turned-around GMA from its state as the one of the leading television networks in the Philippines to its current stature, at some point toppling the long-dominant ABS-CBN in 2004 from their Mega Manila stronghold until today in the Mega Manila ratings. Under his watch, the network has also experienced stability in terms of revenues, mostly from advertising and other revenue sources.

Career:

Atty. Felipe L. Gozon obtained a Bachelor of Laws degree from the University of the Philippines in 1962. He placed 13th during the 1963 Philippine Bar Examination. He obtained his Masters of Laws degree from Yale University in 1965. He is a senior partner in the law firm of Belo Gozon Elma Parel Asuncion & Lucila.

As a distinguished aviation lawyer, he was a member of the Philippine Air Negotiating Panel and is cited in the Asia Pacific Legal 500 as a leading expert in this field.

His business experience includes acting as a director of the International Corporate Bank and as Chairman of Marcopper Mining Corporation. Atty. Gozon has been the Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Company since 1975. He currently holds the positions of Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer. Since assuming leadership of the Company in October 2000, the Company’s ratings have improved greatly, surpassing its nearest competitor in 2003. Atty. Gozon was named CEO of the Year by UNO Magazine in 2004 and Master Entrepreneur of the Year (Philippines) 2004 by SGV/Ernst & Young in 2005. People Asia Magazine included him in the list of People of the Year 2005. He is also currently Chairman, Vice-Chairman or director of several other institutions such as the Malayan Bank Savings & Mortgage Bank, the Children’s Museum and Library, Inc., Asian Institute of Journalism and Communication and the Nova Foundation for Differently Abled Persons, Inc. He is also a director and/or Chairman of some of the subsidiaries and affiliates of the Company, such as GMA New Media, GMA Films, Alta Productions, Citynet, GMA Marketing and Productions, Inc., Scenarios, Inc., EMC Network, Inc., GMA Kapuso Foundation, INQ7 Interactive, Inc., GMA Records, Mont-Aire and Kapwa Ko Mahal Ko.

Gozon was among the 61 awardees that included Reynato Puno, who were honored as UP’s distinguished alumni by the UP Alumni Association (UPAA) at the Araneta Coliseum on June 21, 2008. Gozon received an award for the Lapuz-Gozon family whose members up to the third generation studied in UP

Awards:

2012 : Certificate of Recognition, Civil Aeronautics Board (Philippines)
Platinum Business Icon Award, BizNews Asia
Lifetime Distinguished Achievement Award, University of the Philippines Alumni Association (UPAA)
2011: Tycoon of the Decade, BizNews Asia[11]
Outstanding Manilan, City Government of Manila
2009: Business Excellence Award, BizNews Asia
2005: People of the Year Award, Asia Magazine
2004: CEO of the Year Award, UNO Magazine
Master Entrepreneur Award, SGV/Ernst & Young
1993: Presidential Award of Merit, Philippine Bar Association
1991: Chief Justice Special Award, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the Philippines
1990: Presidential Award of Merit, Philippine Bar Association

Forrest Mars  Jr.
Forrest Mars Jr.

He is the eldest son of the founder of Mars, Inc. He is considered to be the richest man in Virginia. He owns a ranch that is probably rich with coal and natural gas but he has refused to let companies mine the resources. He fears that the water that would be used might dry out his ranch.

Francisco D’Souza
Francisco D’Souza

Francisco Dsouza (born 23 August 1968 (age 47)), who goes by Frank, is the CEO of Cognizant and was part of the team that founded the NASDAQ-100 company in 1994. In 2007, at the age of 38, he took over from Lakshmi Narayanan, who was promoted to Vice Chairman. Francisco is Cognizant’s CEO since January 2007 . Francisco D’Souza is among the youngest Chief Executive Officers in the software services sector.

Career:

Francisco D’Souza has more than 20 years of experience in the information technology industry, in both operational and advisory roles. Effective 1 January 2007, D’Souza was appointed President and Chief Executive Officer and a member of the Board of Directors of Cognizant. He oversees much of the operations and business development of the company, working closely with Cognizant clients who are using offshore resources to execute large software development and maintenance projects.[citation needed

At Cognizant, which he joined in its early days, D’Souza was elected Chief Operating Officer (COO) in December 2003. Prior to that, from November 1999 to December 2003, he served as Senior Vice President (SVP), North American Operations and Business Development. From March 1998 to November 1999, he served as Vice President (VP), North American Operations and Business Development and as Director-North American Operations and Business Development from June 1997 to March 1998. From January 1996 to June 1997, D’Souza was engaged as a consultant. He has been noted for his quick rise to the top of his profession.

From February 1995 to December 1995, D’Souza was employed as Product Manager at Pilot Software. Pilot was a Fuse Global Investment fund venture and leader in enterprise software. Between 1992 and 1995, D’Souza held various marketing, business development, and technology management positions as a Management Associate at The Dun & Bradstreet Corporation in Germany, the United States and India. While working at The Dun & Bradstreet Corporation, D’Souza was part of the team that established the software development and maintenance business conducted by Cognizant.

In February 2013, D’Souza was appointed as independent director on the board of General Electric.

Awards and recognitions:

D’Souza has received the following honors:

2002 – Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year finalist
2005 – The Economic Times Entrepreneur Award
2009 – named among “America’s Best CEOs” by Institutional Investor magazine
2013 – named among “100 CEO Leaders in STEM” by STEMconnector[5]
2013 – Recognized as the Best CEO in the Multinational Company category by Forbes India magazine as part of its 2013 Leadership Awards.
2014 – “Newsmaker of the Year” by The Financial Express

Frank Blake
Frank Blake

Francis Stanton “Frank” Blake (born July 30, 1949) is an American businessman and lawyer, who was the chairman and CEO of The Home Depot from January 2007 to May 2014. Prior to this he worked for the U.S. Department of Energy and General Electric. He was a longtime protégé of Robert Nardelli

Education and family:

Blake attended Brooks School in North Andover, Massachusetts, class of 1967. He received his bachelor’s degree from Harvard University in 1971 and a Juris Doctor from Columbia Law School in 1976.

In 1977, Blake married Anne McChristian with whom he had two children. In 2005, he married Elizabeth Lanier (Blake) who works as general counsel for Habitat for Humanity International.

Legal career:

From 1971–1973 Blake was a legislative assistant to the joint committee on Social Welfare of the Massachusetts legislature. He was admitted to the District of Columbia bar in 1978. He served as a law clerk to Judge Wilfred Feinberg and then to Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens. Blake also served as general counsel for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), deputy counsel to Vice President George H. W. Bush.

CEO of Home Depot:

After Nardelli resigned as Chairman and CEO on January 3, 2007, amid controversy over the company’s stagnating stock price, poor customer service and Nardelli’s salary, Blake was elevated to these positions. Although a longtime deputy to Nardelli at GE and Home Depot, Blake has been said to lack Nardelli’s hard edge and instead prefers to make decisions by consensus. Indeed, Blake repudiated many of his predecessor’s strategies, and it has been reported that the two men have not spoken since Nardelli departed Home Depot.

Nardelli had pushed hard to make the company more efficient, instituting many metrics and centralizing operations, while cutting jobs to meet quarterly earnings targets. While this initially doubled earnings and reduced expenses, it alienated many of the store managers and rank-and-file store associates, and by extension the customers, resulting in a drop in same-store sales which is a key metric that analysts used to gauge the company stock. Nardelli, who regarded home improvement store-by-store sales as less important due to market saturation from competition such as Lowe’s, aimed to dominate the wholesale housing-supply business though building up HD Supply, a unit that Blake sold for $8.5 billion in August 2007 since it was not part of Home Depot’s integrated business.

In comparison to Nardelli whose numbers-driven approach never appreciated the role of the store and its associates, Blake’s strategy has revolved around reinvigorating the stores and its service culture (engaging employees, making products readily available and exciting to customers, improving the store environment, and dominating the professional contracting business, an area in which Home Depot’s closest rivals trail far behind), as he recognized that employee morale is a more sensitive issue in retail compared to other industry sectors like manufacturing. Blake was given credit for returning to the “Orange Apron Cult — the nearly religious zeal for knowledgeable employees and high levels of customer service that was the secret of the company’s original success”, as he believed that customer service was the key to Home Depot to differentiate itself from competitors on aspects other than price.

Under Nardelli’s tenure, Home Depot’s stock performance lagged behind rival Lowe’s, however this situation has been reversed under Blake.

On August 21, 2014, The Home Depot announced that Craig Menear, President of U.S. Retail for The Home Depot, would take over as President and CEO on November 1, 2014. Menear has also been elected to the Board of Directors, effective immediately. Blake will remain Chairman.

Frederick W. Smith
Frederick W. Smith

Frederick Wallace “Fred” Smith (born August 11, 1944), is the founder, chairman, president, and CEO of FedEx, originally known as Federal Express.The company is headquartered in Memphis, Tennessee.

Business career:

In 1970, Smith purchased the controlling interest in an aircraft maintenance company, Ark Aviation Sales, and by 1971 turned its focus to trading used jets. On June 18, 1971, Smith founded Federal Express with his $4 million inheritance (approximately $23 million in 2013 dollars), and raised $91 million (approximately $525 million in 2013 dollars) in venture capital. In 1973, the company began offering service to 25 cities, and it began with small packages and documents and a fleet of 14 Falcon 20 (DA-20) jets. His focus was on developing an integrated air-ground system, which had never been done before. Smith developed FedEx on the business idea of a shipment version of a bank clearing house where one bank clearing house was located in the middle of the representative banks and all their representatives would be sent to the central location to exchange materials.

In the early days of FedEx, Smith had to go to great lengths to keep the company afloat. In one instance, he took the company’s last $5,000 to Las Vegas and won $27,000 gambling on blackjack to cover the company’s $24,000 fuel bill.

Smith has served on the boards of several large public companies, the St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and Mayo Foundation boards. He was formerly chairman of the Board of Governors for the International Air Transport Association and the U.S. Air Transport Association. Smith is chair of the Business Roundtable’s Security Task Force, and a member of the Business Council and the Cato Institute. He served as chairman of the U.S.-China Business Council and is the current chairman of the French-American Business Council. In addition, Smith was named 2006 Person of the Year by the French-American Chamber of Commerce. He is a member of the Aviation Hall of Fame. Smith was approached by Senator Bob Dole, who asked Smith for support in opening corporate doors for a new World War II memorial.Smith was appointed to co-chairman of the U.S. World War II Memorial Project. Smith was named as Chief Executive magazine’s 2004 “CEO of the Year”.

In addition to FedEx, Smith is also a co-owner of the Washington Redskins NFL Team. His son, Arthur Smith, who played football at the University of North Carolina, is an Offensive Line/Tight End Assistant Coach for the Tennessee Titans. This partnership resulted in FedEx sponsorship of the Joe Gibbs NASCAR racing team. Smith also owns or co-owns several entertainment companies, including Dream Image Productions and Alcon Films (producers of the Warner Bros. film Insomnia starring Al Pacino and Robin Williams).

In 2000, Smith made an appearance as himself in the Tom Hanks movie Cast Away, when Tom’s character is welcomed back, which was filmed on location at FedEx’s home facilities in Memphis, Tennessee.

A DKE Fraternity Brother of George W. Bush while at Yale, after Bush’s 2000 election, there was some speculation that Smith might be appointed to the Bush Cabinet as Defense Secretary. While Smith was Bush’s first choice for the position, he declined for medical reasons — Donald Rumsfeld was named instead. Although Smith was friends with both 2004 major candidates, John Kerry and George W. Bush, Smith chose to endorse Bush’s re-election in 2004. When Bush decided to replace Rumsfeld, Smith was offered the position again, but he declined in order to spend time with his terminally ill daughter.

Smith was a supporter of Senator John McCain’s 2008 Presidential bid, and had been named McCain’s National Co-Chairman of his campaign committee. Some had speculated that Smith might have a role as an economic advisor in a theoretical McCain administration.

Smith was inducted into the Junior Achievement U.S. Business Hall of Fame in 1998 and to the SMEI Sales & Marketing Hall of Fame in 2000. His other awards include “CEO of the Year 2004” by Chief Executive Magazine and the 2008 Kellogg Award for Distinguished Leadership, presented by the Kellogg School of Management on May 29, 2008. He was also awarded the 2008 Bower Award for Business Leadership from The Franklin Institute in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[18] He is the 2011 recipient of the Tony Jannus Award for distinguished contributions to commercial aviation.

While CEO of FedEx in 2008, Frederick W. Smith earned a total compensation of $10,434,589, which included a base salary of $1,430,466, a cash bonus of $2,705,000, stocks granted of $0, and options granted of $5,461,575. In June 2009, Smith expressed interest in purchasing the controlling share (60%) of the St. Louis Rams from Chip Rosenbloom and Lucia Rodriguez. In 2009, Frederick W. Smith earned a total compensation of $7,740,658, which included a base salary of $1,355,028, a cash bonus of $0, stocks granted of $0, options granted of $5,079,191, and other compensation totaling $1,306,439.

In March 2014, Fortune Magazine ranked him 26th among the list of “World’s 50 Greatest Leaders”

Smith currently resides in Memphis.

Fujio Mitarai
Fujio Mitarai

Fujio Mitarai has served as the CEO of the camera giant Canon for a longtime. The company fortunes were steadily reducing until Fujio took over in the 90’s.

He is admired because of his concerns on retirement regulations and policies in Japan. He acted as the Chairman of Japan’s influential Keidanren Business lobby, pushing the authorities to overhaul the tax system and social security so as to make sure workers get paid after retirement.