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Steve Burke
Steve Burke

Stephen B. “Steve” Burke (born August 14, 1958) is an American businessman. He serves as the executive vice president of Comcast, and as president and chief executive officer (CEO) of NBCUniversal.

Early life:

Steve Burke is an Irish Catholic. His father, Daniel B. Burke was a former president of Capital Cities Communications, former owner of the ABC network. He graduated from Colgate University, where he was a member of Phi Beta Kappa, and earned an MBA from the Harvard Business School.

Business:

Burke joined The Walt Disney Company in January 1986, where he helped to develop and found The Disney Stores. In 1992, he moved to Euro Disney S.A., where, as President and CEO, he helped to lead a comprehensive restructuring effort. He later served as President of ABC Broadcasting.

In 1998, he joined Comcast as President of Comcast Cable. Since then, Comcast has become the largest cable company, largest residential internet service provider, third largest phone company in America and launched a wireless business. He led Comcast to leadership in multi-platform video entertainment distribution, including the Company’s industry changing video on demand platform and online video offerings. He has been praised for leading the highly successful integration of AT&T Broadband with Comcast.

He currently serves as the Chief Executive Officer of NBCUniversal. He oversees the company’s valuable portfolio of news, sports, and entertainment networks, a premier motion picture company, significant television production operations, a leading television stations group, and theme parks. Burke assumed this role in January 2011, upon the closing of Comcast and General Electric’s joint venture merging the assets of NBCUniversal with Comcast’s programming assets. He previously served as Chief Operating Officer of Comcast Corporation, where he was a driving force in its growth from a cable industry leader to one of the nation’s leading providers of entertainment, information and communication products and services.

He serves on the Boards of Directors of Berkshire Hathaway and JPMorgan Chase. He also serves on the Board of Trustees of the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.

Steve Easterbrook
Steve Easterbrook

Stephen James Easterbrook (born August 1967) is a British corporate executive.On 1 March 2015, after being chief brand officer of McDonald’s and its former head in the UK and northern Europe, he became the CEO of the company, succeeding Don Thompson, who stepped down on 28 January 2015.

Early life:

Stephen James Easterbrook was born in August 1967. He grew up in Watfordand was educated there at Watford Grammar School for Boys.He studied natural sciences at St Chad’s College, Durham University, where he played cricket with fellow student, Nasser Hussain, the former England cricket captain.

Career:

After university, he trained as an accountant with Price Waterhouse.Easterbrook first worked for McDonald’s in 1993 as a manager in London. In 2011 he left to become CEO of PizzaExpress and then CEO of Wagamama, two British casual dining chains, before returning to McDonald’s in 2013.

Personal life:

He is married with three children, who visit McDonald’s 113 times a month.He lives in Illinois and is a Watford FC football fan.

Steve Jobs
Steve Jobs

He was the founder and chief designer of Apple, Inc. He is responsible for the popularity of the current wave of modern products that we enjoy today, like the iPad, iPhone and iPod.

Steve Luczo
Steve Luczo

Stephen J. “Steve” Luczo (born February 28, 1957 in Chicago, Illinois) is the Chairman of the board of directors and CEO of Seagate. In January 2009, Luczo, Seagate’s chairman, was appointed president and chief executive officer, returning him to the role he held at Seagate from 1998 to 2004. Since Luczo’s return in 2009, Seagate’s stock has appreciated by 1600%, placing it among the top 5 performing stocks in the S&P 500.

Luczo is a member of the board of directors of the World Wildlife Fund, a member of the Advisory Board for All-Stars Helping Kids and is active in a variety of charitable and for-profit ventures through a wholly owned entity, Balance Vector, Inc. His charity initiatives are primarily focused on global environmental issues and programs to help at-risk children in the urban centers of the United States and the rural areas of Sicily, and he is a major donor to Stanford University and Hospital, the World Wildlife Fund, and the Palo Alto Medical Foundation. In 2015, to recognize his support for education in service to the Italian Republic, Italy’s President Sergio Mattarella honored Luczo with the title Cavaliere dell’Ordine della Stella d’Italia (a knighthood known in English as the “Order of the Star of Italian Solidarity”).

He has served on the boards of directors of Microsoft Corporation (including serving on the CEO Search Committee and as Chairman of the Compensation Committee), Veritas Software and VMWare. Luczo also served on the Advisory Boards of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) and the Stanford Graduate School of Business.

In 2016 Institutional Investor (magazine) ranked Luczo among the world’s top 3 CEOs of IT Hardware & Electronics Manufacturing Services companies, based on the votes of sell-side analysts; in 2015 the magazine ranked him a top 3 CEO in the same category, based on buy-side analysts’ votes, and in 2014 he was ranked a top 5 CEO by sell-side analysts in the same category. In 2015, Harvard Business Review ranked Luczo number 6 among “The Best-Performing CEOs in the World.” In 2014, CNN Money named Luczo among the 5 top performing CEOs in America,

and Harvard Business Review ranked Luczo number 34 among the top 100 “Best-Performing CEOs in the World.” In 2013 Bloomberg ranked Luczo No. 1 among its Top 20 list of technology leaders. In August, 2013, Luczo was awarded the Darjah Setia Pangkuan Negeri (DSPN), the Order of the Defender of State — Knight Commander Mylaysia, which carries the title of Dato, for his contributions to the state of Penang. In 2012, Luczo was ranked 21st on Fortune Magazine’s Top 50 Businesspersons of the Year.

Stephen J. “Steve” Luczo (born February 28, 1957 in Chicago, Illinois) is the Chairman of the board of directors and CEO of Seagate. In January 2009, Luczo, Seagate’s chairman, was appointed president and chief executive officer, returning him to the role he held at Seagate from 1998 to 2004. Since Luczo’s return in 2009, Seagate’s stock has appreciated by 1600%, placing it among the top 5 performing stocks in the S&P 500.

Luczo is a member of the board of directors of the World Wildlife Fund, a member of the Advisory Board for All-Stars Helping Kids and is active in a variety of charitable and for-profit ventures through a wholly owned entity, Balance Vector, Inc. His charity initiatives are primarily focused on global environmental issues and programs to help at-risk children in the urban centers of the United States and the rural areas of Sicily, and he is a major donor to Stanford University and Hospital, the World Wildlife Fund, and the Palo Alto Medical Foundation. In 2015, to recognize his support for education in service to the Italian Republic, Italy’s President Sergio Mattarella honored Luczo with the title Cavaliere dell’Ordine della Stella d’Italia (a knighthood known in English as the “Order of the Star of Italian Solidarity”).

He has served on the boards of directors of Microsoft Corporation (including serving on the CEO Search Committee and as Chairman of the Compensation Committee), Veritas Software and VMWare. Luczo also served on the Advisory Boards of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) and the Stanford Graduate School of Business.

In 2016 Institutional Investor (magazine) ranked Luczo among the world’s top 3 CEOs of IT Hardware & Electronics Manufacturing Services companies, based on the votes of sell-side analysts; in 2015 the magazine ranked him a top 3 CEO in the same category, based on buy-side analysts’ votes, and in 2014 he was ranked a top 5 CEO by sell-side analysts in the same category. In 2015, Harvard Business Review ranked Luczo number 6 among “The Best-Performing CEOs in the World.” In 2014, CNN Money named Luczo among the 5 top performing CEOs in America, and Harvard Business Review ranked Luczo number 34 among the top 100 “Best-Performing CEOs in the World.” In 2013 Bloomberg ranked Luczo No. 1 among its Top 20 list of technology leaders. In August, 2013, Luczo was awarded the Darjah Setia Pangkuan Negeri (DSPN), the Order of the Defender of State — Knight Commander Mylaysia, which carries the title of Dato, for his contributions to the state of Penang. In 2012, Luczo was ranked 21st on Fortune Magazine’s Top 50 Businesspersons of the Year.

Early career:

After graduating from Stanford in 1979, Steve was hired as a staff accountant in the audit practice of Touche Ross &Co., one of the original “Big Eight” accounting firms. Luczo was the first non- accounting major hired by the firm to work in the audit group. During his first year, he was assigned to assist the City and County of San Francisco in transitioning to a new, then state of the art, mini computing system. During the transition, the City lost control over its cash and payables system, and Luczo was assigned to a 3-member special team appointed by Mayor Dianne Feinstein, to resolve the system issue, which had resulted in a $200 million discrepancy between the cash system and the payable system. The issue was resolved within 5 days and as a result, Luczo was offered the opportunity to lead system deployment at any of 5 major City Departments.

Luczo left Touch Ross in 1980 to pursue the system development and deployment at the Port of San Francisco, which was transitioning from a Sperry Univac 1005 to a Microdata Minicomputer. He was responsible for managing all systems and application architecture and development for the Port, reporting to the chief financial officer. In late 1981 he was promoted to Acting chief financial officer of the Port, and resigned in August 1982 to attend the Stanford Graduate School of Business.

After graduating from the Stanford GSB in 1984, Steve joined Salomon Brothers, Inc. He attended the 1984 Salomon Brothers training program (the year before Michael Lewis did as described in Liar’s Poker and was hired into the Municipal Finance Department, and was based in San Francisco. Salomon Brothers was the leading underwriter of Municipal Bonds nationally as was the Firms West Coast office, under the leadership of Terry Atkinson. Luczo financed a wide variety of municipal projects including those for the Irvine Ranch Water District, the LA Department of Water and Power (“LADWOP”), the Metropolitan Water District of LA, the Orange County (“John Wayne”) Airport, the University of Arizona, the Central Arizona Water Project, the Sisters of Providence Health Care System, and the Santa Clara Water District. Luczo was involved with over 50 financings, which provided billions of dollars of funding for important infrastructure, educational and health care projects.

Stephen Luczo was the Senior managing director of the Global Technology Group of Bear, Stearns & Co. Inc., an investment banking firm, from February 1992 to October 1993. Prior to joining Bear, Stearns & Co., he was an investment banker at Salomon Brothers, Inc. from 1984–1992. While at Salomon Brothers, Luczo led the investment banking team for Seagate when it acquired the Imprimis Disk Drive Unit from Control Data in 1989. Subsequent to his advisory work for Seagate, Luczo advised Control Data in the formation of Ceridian and Control Data Systems

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Steve Odland
Steve Odland

Steve Odland is an American businessman. He is President and CEO of the Committee for Economic Development.

Biography:

Early life:

Steve Odland has a Bachelor of Business Administration from The University of Notre Dame, and a master’s degree in management from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University.

Career:

He taught as an Adjunct Professor in the graduate schools of business at Florida Atlantic University and at Lynn University from 2010-2011. He was Chairman and CEO of Office Depot from 2005 – 2010, and was Chairman, President, and Chief Executive Officer of AutoZone from 2001 until 2005. He was President & CEO of Tops Markets, Inc. from 1998 to 2000, served as President of the Foodservice Division of Sara Lee Bakery from 1997 to 1998, and worked for The Quaker Oats Company from 1981 to 1996 in various executive positions.

He is a Director of General Mills and Analogic. He is also a Trustee of The Conference Board and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. He also has been a member of the Business Roundtable; a commissioner on the National Surface Transportation Policy and Revenue Study Commission; a member of the Committee on Capital Markets Regulation; a U.S. Presidential Appointee, President’s Council on Service and Civic Participation; a member of the Advisory Council, Institute for Corporate Ethics; a member of the Advisory Council, University of Notre Dame Mendoza College of Business; and a member of the Florida Council of 100.

He is a regular CNBC contributor and has published a blog on Forbes.

Steven A. Kandarian
Steven A. Kandarian

Steven A. Kandarian is the president, chairman, and chief executive officer of MetLife. He became president and CEO on May 1, 2011,and chairman in January 2012 succeeding Robert Henrikson, who retired from those roles.

Life and career:

Kandarian grew up in West Hartford, Connecticut, the son of Lillian and Albert Kandarian. He graduated from William H. Hall High School and held several roles in private equity, including as founder and managing partner of Orion Partners, LP and executive director of the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation. He is a board member of the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation and a member of the Financial Services Forum and the Economic Club of New York. He received a B.A. from Clark University, a J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center, and a M.B.A. from Harvard Business School.

MetLife:

Prior to becoming CEO, Kandarian was MetLife’s chief investment officer since April 2005. As CIO, Kandarian oversaw a number of initiatives that strengthened MetLife’s investment portfolio, enhanced the company’s focus on effective risk management and contributed to the bottom line. He is credited with preparing MetLife’s portfolio prior to the 2007 recession, partly by anticipating the housing bubble and selling Stuyvesant Town—Peter Cooper Village in Manhattan in 2006.

In his first three months as CEO, Kandarian expanded the company’s senior leadership team with the hiring of Frans Hijkoop to head human resources and Martin Lippert to oversee global technology. He also announced MetLife’s 25-year agreement to acquire the naming rights to the home of the New York Giants and New York Jets, which is now known as MetLife Stadium.

In addition, Kandarian has also moved the company away from retail banking. On July 21, 2011, MetLife said the company would seek to sell its deposit banking business. In announcing the move, Kandarian said it “was not appropriate for the overwhelming majority of our business to be governed by regulations written for banking institutions.” Three months later, MetLife said it would look to sell its residential mortgage lending business as well, saying the marketplace and regulatory environment for the business was uncertain and that the company needed to focus its resources on its global insurance and employee benefits businesses.

Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation:

Kandarian is a former executive director of the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation.an agency of the United States Government. Kandarian was appointed to head the PBGC on Dec. 2, 2001, by Secretary of Labor Elaine L. Chao, announcing his departure in January 7, 2004 to return to his family in Boston. He left on February 13, 2004.

Protests:

In May 2016, Kandarian became the target of protests by animal rights activists angered at MetLife’s partnership with the New York Blood Center (NYBC), which abandoned 66 lab chimpanzees with no food and water on islands in Liberia. The chimpanzees, who were used by NYBC in invasive medical experiments for over the course of three decades, have earned the organization an estimated $500 million dollars in royalties. The protests, which have taken place at Kandarian’s home in Summit, NJ, and at the MetLife building in NYC, were staged after activists’ year-long attempts to meet with Kandarian and MetLife were rebuffed. World renowned primatologist Dr. Jane Goodall has dismissed NYBC’s claim that the Liberian government should pay for the care of the chimps: “This seems irrelevant since NYBC was responsible for funding the acquisition of these chimpanzees, some of whom were taken from the wild after shooting their mothers”.

Stuart Gulliver
Stuart Gulliver

Stuart Thomson Gulliver (born 9 March 1959) is a British banking business executive. He is the current Group Chief Executive of HSBC, a position he has held since 1 January 2011.

Gulliver was born in Derby, England, and holds a degree in Jurisprudence from Worcester College, Oxford. He officially lives in Hong Kong; and has a primary residence in Kensington, London. The Guardian revealed he sheltered £5,000,000 in a Panamanian company with a Swiss HSBC account.

Early life and education:

He was born in the UK in 1959. His father Philip was a legal executive, while his mother Jean was personal assistant to the senior engineer at a local dockyard. Gulliver went to Grammar school in Plymouth, Devon.

Gulliver was an avid boxer while at Oxford, where he studied law and received a Masters degree in Jurisprudence. In a 2011 interview to Financial Times, Gulliver recalls his humble upbringing and his childhood aspiration, and said: “I wanted to be a barrister, but my parents couldn’t afford it”.

Professional career:

Early Career and HSBC (1980-2010):

In 1980, an HSBC executive serving in India urged him to join HSBC’s elite international officer programme, as it was called at that time, which paved the way for his banking career. Gulliver rose through the ranks in the bank’s Global banking and markets division,[10] and held a number of key roles in the group’s operations worldwide; including postings in London, Hong Kong, Tokyo, Kuala Lumpur and the United Arab Emirates.

During the 1990s, Gulliver built HSBC’s investment banking business in Hong Kong and turned HSBC’s Asian markets business into one of the group’s major money-spinners, even in the aftermath of the Asian financial crisis. He served as the head of treasury and capital markets in Asia-Pacific from 1996 to 2002.

He was appointed a Group General Manager in 2000, and later he led the Global Markets division from 2002 to 2003. He moved back to London in early 2003 to co-head the Group’s Global corporate, investment banking and markets division along with John Studzinski. In March 2004, he joined the Group Management Board as a Group Managing Director. Upon the departure of John Studzinski in 2006, he was appointed Chief Executive of Global Banking and Markets and HSBC Global Asset Management in May 2006.

He was a director of HSBC North America holdings Inc. until 7 May 2009; of HSBC Bank Middle East ltd from 15 February 2010 to 1 May 2011; of HSBC Latin America Holdings (UK) Limited until 4 December 2009.

He is Deputy Chairman of the Supervisory Committee of HSBC Trinkaus & Burkhardt AG (since September 2007; member since May 2006); non-Executive Chairman and a Director of HSBC France since January 2009; and Chairman of HSBC Private Banking Holdings (Suisse) SA since February 2010 (Director since September 2007).

He was made a director of The Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation Limited in September 2006 and has been an Executive Director of HSBC Holdings plc since May 2008.

Group CEO of HSBC (2010-present):

On 7 September 2010, Stephen Green,the then Group Chairman of HSBC, announced that he would step down, in order to accept the invitation of the UK Prime Minister to become Minister of State for Trade and Investment in January 2011. As a result of Stephen Green’s decision to step down earlier than planned, Michael Geoghegan, the then Group CEO of HSBC, announced his retirement and Stuart Gulliver, who led HSBC’s investment-banking division since 2006, was appointed as the new Group CEO of HSBC Holdings plc, effective 1 January 2011.

He was also appointed the Chairman of The Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation Limited, a wholly owned subsidiary of HSBC Holdings plc.

In 2011, he was included in the 50 Most Influential ranking of Bloomberg Markets.

In 2014, he received a total of £7.6 million in pay and bonuses.

Stuart Rose
Stuart Rose

Stuart Alan Ransom Rose, Baron Rose of Monewden Kt (born 17 March 1949) is an English businessman, who was the executive chairman of the British retailer Marks & Spencer. Following the appointment of Marc Bolland in May 2010, Rose stepped down as executive chairman at the end of July 2010 and remained as chairman until early 2011 when he was replaced by Robert Swannell. He was knighted in 2008 for his services to the retail industry,and created a Conservative Life Peer on 17 September 2014, taking the title Baron Rose of Monewden, of Monewden in the County of Suffolk.

Career:

Rose first joined Marks & Spencer in 1972, as a management trainee. Rose remained with Marks & Spencer until 1989, when he joined the Burton Group as Chief Executive in 1994. The Burton Group demerged, forming the Arcadia and Debenhams businesses.

In 1997, he joined Argos as Chief Executive, where he was charged with defending the company against a takeover bid from the home shopping giant, Great Universal Stores (GUS). Ultimately, GUS did succeed in taking control of Argos, although Rose was widely praised for negotiating an increased price for the retailer.

In a turbulent time in its history, Rose became the Chief Executive of Booker plc, where he oversaw the merger of the company with Iceland to form the Big Food Group.

Rose joined the Arcadia Group in 2000 as Chief Executive and left in 2002 following its acquisition. Rose turned around the fortunes of the Arcadia Group, and sold the group for over £800m, netting himself around £25m as part of the deal.

Rose received an Honorary Doctorate from Heriot-Watt University in 2007

He was appointed to the position of Chief Executive of Marks & Spencer in May 2004 at the age of 56 and subsequently fought off several takeover bids by Philip Green for the Group. For this role he was paid an annual salary of £1,130,000. Rose appeared to be rejuvenating the Marks & Spencer Group as he did at Arcadia. In January 2007, he was named the “2006 Business Leader of the Year” by the World Leadership Forum for his efforts in restoring the fortunes of Marks & Spencer. He was knighted in the 2008 New Year Honours and was appointed chairman of Business in the Community on 1 January 2008.

On 10 March 2008, it was reported that Rose was to become executive chairman of Marks & Spencer from 1 June 2008.However, in the light of a recent profits warning, which sparked an unprecedented thirty per cent-plus plunge in the company’s shares, this appointment caused some concern to many shareholders.Nevertheless, they voted to re-appoint him at their annual meeting on 9 July 2008.

He stepped down as chief executive in May 2010, as executive chairman in July 2010, and as chairman in January 2011 following the appointment of Robert Swannell.

On 19 January 2011, Rose was appointed as a non-executive director of Woolworths Holdings Ltd, a large South African retail group listed on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange.

On 6 September 2012, Rose was appointed as non-executive chairman of Dressipi.com, an online personalised fashion service that matches clothes and accessories to a shopper’s shape, style and individual preferences.

On 22 January 2013 it was announced that Rose will be appointed as an independent non-executive director and chairman Designate of Ocado, a UK internet-only grocery retailer, effective from 11 March.

He was recruited to advise the Government on turning around failing hospitals, asked to examine how to improve the organisational culture in under-performing hospitals and ways to recruit talent from inside and outside the NHS in February 2014.

In 2014, Rose was created a life peer and took a seat on the Conservative Benches in the House of Lords.

Subrah Iyar
Subrah Iyar

– Subrah S. Iyar (b. 1957) is a leading technocrat, entrepreneur and Web conferencing pioneer of Indian origin. He is the founder and CEO of WebEx which has recently merged with Cisco Systems.

Early life

Subrah S. Iyar was born and brought up in Mumbai, in a Tamil family. He did his schooling in Mumbai and graduated from the Indian Institute of Technology. On completion of his graduation he moved to the US in 1982. He worked with Intel, Apple Inc., Quarterdeck, and Teleos Research prior to the establishment of WebEx.

Founding of WebEx

Iyar chose to take the path of an entrepreneur in 1996, when he founded WebEx in partnership with Min Zhu.

The founding of the company by Subrah Iyar was fuelled by a new-found interest in web conferencing. Min Zhu, a Stanford-trained System Engineer had been struggling to develop a web-conferencing tool. Coincidentally, during this time, he befriended Subrah Iyar who was running Quarterdeck’s research lab and the two formed a partnership.

Growth of WebEx

WebEx struggled to make a profit in its early days, largely because of low bandwidth. However, with the advancement of technology and the shift to broadband technology, it began to emerge as a potent competitor with clients such as Hoover’s Online, Oracle and Tibco Software. WebEx went on to receive its first funding of $25 million in December 1999.

As a result of the new ideas propounded by Subrah Iyer, 2000 became a honeymoon year for WebEx. The revenues crossed the million mark and Subrah Iyar’s own net worth rocketed from a paltry $450,000 in January 2000 to $129 million in November 2000. When enquired about it in an interview at a later stage, Subrah Iyar remarked: “It didn’t get too scary, because I knew we had done everything based on fundamentals. You always have a feeling of uncertainty. But it was never a feeling of terror.”

In 2003, when Microsoft purchased conferencing company Placeware it was thought to be the end of the road for Subrah Iyar and WebEx. However, WebEx survived and completed a $45 million acquisition of Intranets.com in 2005. In fact, as per the company website, more than 3.5 million people use Cisco’s WebEx products every month to communicate and collaborate online.

On March 15, 2007, Cisco Systems purchased WebEx for $3.2 billion.

Founding of Moxtra

In 2012, Iyar became Co-Founder and CEO of Moxtra, Inc. While working at WebEx, Iyer noted the need for the adhoc meeting for people on the move, it was this need that lead to the inspiration of the Moxtra app. Moxtra is a mobile content collaboration app that received its first round of funding by Cisco and KDDI from Japan.

Sumner Redstone
Sumner Redstone

Sumner Murray Redstone (born Sumner Murray Rothstein; May 27, 1923) is an American businessman and media magnate. He is the majority owner and chairman of the board of the National Amusements theater chain. Through National Amusements, Redstone and his family are majority owners of CBS Corporation and Viacom (itself the parent company of Viacom Media Networks, BET Networks, and the film studio Paramount Pictures). According to Forbes, as of September 2015, he was worth US$5 billion.

Redstone was formerly the executive chairman of both CBS and Viacom. In February 2016, at the age of 92, a week after a court-ordered examination by a geriatric psychiatrist, Redstone resigned both chairmanships, replaced by Leslie Moonves at CBS and Philippe Dauman at Viacom. Redstone then became chairman emeritus.

Early life and education:

Sumner was born to a Jewish family in Boston, Massachusetts, to Belle (née Ostrovsky) and Michael Rothstein. In 1940, at Sumner’s behest his father agreed to change the family surname from “Rothstein” to “Redstone” (“Red stone” is a literal translation of the German-Jewish name, “Rothstein”).Michael Rothstein owned Northeast Theater Corporation in Dedham, Massachusetts (the forerunner of National Amusements) and the Boston branch of the Latin Quarter Nightclub.

Redstone attended the Boston Latin School, from which he graduated first in his class. In 1944, he graduated from Harvard College,where he completed the studies for his baccalaureate in three years. Later, Redstone served as First Lieutenant in the United States Army during World War II with a team that decoded Japanese messages. After this military service, he worked in Washington, D.C., and attended Georgetown University Law Center. He transferred to Harvard Law School and received his law degree in 1947.

After completing law school, Redstone served as special assistant to U.S. Attorney General Tom C. Clark (who later served as Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1949 to 1967) and then worked for the United States Department of Justice Tax Division in Washington, D.C. and San Francisco, and thereafter entered private practice. In 1954, he joined his father’s theater chain, National Amusements and in 1967, he became CEO of the company. As the company grew, Redstone came to believe that content would become more important than distribution mechanisms: channels of distribution (in varied forms) would always exist, but content would always be essential (Redstone coined the phrase, “Content is king!”). He invested in Columbia Pictures, Twentieth Century Fox, Orion Pictures, and Paramount Pictures (Redstone’s Viacom would buy Paramount in the 1990s), all of which turned over huge profits when he chose to sell their stock in the early 1980s.

In 1979, he suffered severe burns in a fire at the Copley Plaza hotel, in Boston, but survived after thirty hours of extensive surgery at Massachusetts General Hospital. Though he was warned that he might never be able to live a normal life, eight years later he was fit enough to insist on playing tennis nearly every day and to launch a hostile takeover of Viacom.Redstone has discussed the story of surviving the fire as a reflection of his strong determination and will to live.
Philanthropy:

Sumner Redstone has contributed over $150 million to various philanthropic causes.

In April 2007, Sumner M. Redstone announced a commitment of $105 million in charitable grants to fund research and patient care advancements in cancer and burn recovery at three major non-profit healthcare organizations. The cash contributions of $35 million each will be paid out over five years to FasterCures/The Center for Accelerating Medical Solutions, based in Washington, D.C.; the Cedars-Sinai Prostate Cancer Center in Los Angeles, California; and the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts.
Over the last few years, Redstone has contributed $1.5 million to the Global Poverty Project.
He has given millions of dollars to the Cambodian Children’s Fund, a nonprofit program that provides a wide range of critical health and educational services to impoverished and abused children in the capital city of Phnom Penh. Redstone’s contribution will be used to create the Sumner M. Redstone Child Rescue Center, a stand-alone facility scheduled to open during the fall of 2007 for children 5 to 16.
In early 2010, Redstone pledged a $1 million gift to Autism Speaks in support of scientific research into the causes of autism and effective treatments. Redstone had given financial support to Autism Speaks previously.In 2011, Redstone gave an additional $500,000 to the group in support of its Translational Research Initiative, bringing his cumulative lifetime contribution to Autism Speaks to $1.7 million.
In July 2010, Redstone donated $24 million to the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California to support cancer research.
In September 2012, Redstone donated $18 million to the Boston University School of Law. The gift funded, in part, the construction of the five-story Sumner M. Redstone Building, a classroom building which opened in 2014.
Since October 2012, Redstone has donated a total of $350,000 to the Go Campaign, which funds projects in 21 countries with a focus on helping orphans and other needy children.
In May 2013, the Sumner M. Redstone Charitable Foundation donated $1 million to Literacy Inc., a New York City-based nonprofit literacy organization.
In January 2014, it was announced that the Sumner M. Redstone Charitable Foundation had donated $10 million to Harvard Law School for public-interest fellowships, the largest charitable contribution ever made to the law school in support of public service. The money supports students who work in public-interest positions after graduation.